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Virtual Book Display

Explore virtual collections of books and ebooks by monthly themes curated by University of Memphis librarians.

Virtual Book Display

Pickup Books from the Checkout Desk

Save some time by using the forms below to request a book be held for you at the Checkout Desk!

You will need the book's title, author, and call number. We will send you an email when the book is ready Please allow 24 hours for the library to fulfill your request. Your book will be waiting for you at the Checkout Desk - be sure to bring your UofM ID!

McWherter Library
Lambuth Library
Music Library

Want to Check Out a Physical Book?

McWherter Library is currently open to students, faculty, and staff with a valid UofM ID! Visit the library to retrieve the title yourself, or, feel free to fill out one of the paging slips below for the book that you want to check out. Please allow 24 hours for the library to fulfill your request. Your book will be waiting for you at the Checkout Desk - be sure to bring your UofM ID and a mask to access the building!

McWherter Library
Lambuth Library
Music Library

May 2022: Creative Beginnings / Mystery Month

Just My Type

Just My Type is a book of stories. About how Helvetica and Comic Sans took over the world. About why Barack Obama opted for Gotham, while Amy Winehouse found her soul in 30s Art Deco. About the great originators of type, from Baskerville to Zapf, or people like Neville Brody who threw out the rulebook, or Margaret Calvert, who invented the motorway signs that are used from Watford Gap to Abu Dhabi. About the pivotal moment when fonts left the world of Letraset and were loaded onto computers ... and typefaces became something we realised we all have an opinion about.

Midnight Come Again

Edgar Award winner Dana Stabenow has written nine atmospheric crime novels featuring the very prickly, very human Kate Shugak, but her novels also have a scene-stealing costar: Alaska, unforgiving, breathtaking, dangerous, and beautiful. Stabenow's evocation of this wilderness, combined with her talent for bringing characters to life and creating knuckle-whitening suspense, has made her "one of the strongest voices in crime fiction." (Seattle Times). Now in Midnight Come Again, all these elements come together for Stabenow's most compelling Kate Shugak novel to date. Kate, a former investigator for the Anchorage D.A. and now a P.I. for hire, is missing after a winter spent in mourning. Alaska State Trooper Jim Chopin, Kate's best friend, needs her to help him work a new case. He discovers her hiding out in Bering, a small fishing village on Alaska's western coast, living and working under an assumed name-- working hard, as eighteen-hour workdays seem to be her only justification for getting up in the morning. But before they can even discuss Kate's last several months, or what Jim is doing looking for her in Bering, they're up to their eyes in Jim's case, which is suddenly more complicated-- and more dangerous-- than they suspected. A magnificent crime novel about life in America's last wilderness, the heart-wrenching grief that goes with love, and murder, Midnight Come Again is Dana Stabenow's best novel to date.

Creativity

Creativity: The Human Brain in the Age of Innovation is about creativity, one of the most cherished and mysterious manifestations of the human mind, and what it is in the human brain and its interaction with culture, that allows us to expand how we think about things, generate new knowledge,and to explore unchartered territories. Based on a growing body of scientific literature, Elkhonon Goldberg points to several brain structures and processes that are involved in the creative process: the frontal lobes, the right and left hemispheres and their respective contributions, subcorticalstructures, various biochemical systems, and intricate neural network processes that work in concert for the creative act to happen. To that end, he discusses the brain mechanisms of deciding what is important and what is not; of confronting cognitive novelty; and the marshalling of previouslyacquired knowledge to generate new insights culminating in a creative product.An active researcher neuroscientist and clinician neuropsychologist, who also has a keen interest in history, Elkhonon Goldberg offers an original, and arguably the first coherent account of how multiple brain mechanisms come together in order to culminate in the creative act. While a large body ofscientific material is discussed, the book offers much more than a mere review. It presents a novel understanding of how the creative process takes place, and is full of original insights challenging current assumptions and theories.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold

From the New York Times bestselling author of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy; Our Kind of Traitor; and The Night Manager, now a television series starring Tom Hiddleston. The 50th-anniversary edition of the bestselling novel that launched John le CarrĂ©'s career worldwide In the shadow of the newly erected Berlin Wall, Alec Leamas watches as his last agent is shot dead by East German sentries. For Leamas, the head of Berlin Station, the Cold War is over. As he faces the prospect of retirement or worse--a desk job--Control offers him a unique opportunity for revenge. Assuming the guise of an embittered and dissolute ex-agent, Leamas is set up to trap Mundt, the deputy director of the East German Intelligence Service--with himself as the bait. In the background is George Smiley, ready to make the game play out just as Control wants. Setting a standard that has never been surpassed, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a devastating tale of duplicity and espionage.

63 Ready-To-Use Maker Projects

You know your fellow librarians are a creative bunch-- 63 Maker Projects for Librarians leaves no doubt. Editor and maker Ellyssa Kroski has gathered librarians and makers who work with libraries offer how-to guidance for a remarkable range of projects, as fun as an upcycled fashion show, as practical as Bluetooth speakers, or as mischievous as a catapult. With takeaways like origami tea lights or a T-shirt tote bag, your patrons will remember their fun at the library. You'll find projects for artists, sewers, videographers, coders, and engineers. The quick reference format will help you quickly identify the estimated costs, materials, equipment, and whether the project requires a makerspace (plenty don't). Below is a sampling of the projects.Foam rocket launcherMakey-Makey musical instrumentsStop-Motion Film with 3D Print characters.Found-Object RobotsGlowing ghost marionettes3D Bust Selfie or a giant cardboardArduino eTextilesMagnetic slimeYarn paintingFidget FlannelsLED broochCardboard sculpture

The Yiddish Policemen's Union

For sixty years, Jewish refugees and their descendants have prospered in the Federal District of Sitka, a "temporary" safe haven created in the wake of revelations of the Holocaust and the shocking 1948 collapse of the fledgling state of Israel. Proud, grateful, and longing to be American, the Jews of the Sitka District have created their own little world in the Alaskan panhandle, a vibrant, gritty, soulful, and complex frontier city that moves to the music of Yiddish. For sixty years they have been left alone, neglected and half-forgotten in a backwater of history. Now the District is set to revert to Alaskan control, and their dream is coming to an end: once again the tides of history threaten to sweep them up and carry them off into the unknown. But homicide detective Meyer Landsman of the District Police has enough problems without worrying about the upcoming Reversion. His life is a shambles, his marriage a wreck, his career a disaster. He and his half-Tlingit partner, Berko Shemets, can't catch a break in any of their outstanding cases. Landsman's new supervisor is the love of his life--and also his worst nightmare. And in the cheap hotel where he has washed up, someone has just committed a murder--right under Landsman's nose. Out of habit, obligation, and a mysterious sense that it somehow offers him a shot at redeeming himself, Landsman begins to investigate the killing of his neighbor, a former chess prodigy. But when word comes down from on high that the case is to be dropped immediately, Landsman soon finds himself contending with all the powerful forces of faith, obsession, hopefulness, evil, and salvation that are his heritage--and with the unfinished business of his marriage to Bina Gelbfish, the one person who understands his darkest fears. At once a gripping whodunit, a love story, an homage to 1940s noir, and an exploration of the mysteries of exile and redemption, The Yiddish Policemen's Union is a novel only Michael Chabon could have written.

101 Textures in Colored Pencil

Get a feel for your art--literally! 101 Textures in Colored Pencil teaches you every technique you'll need to give your colored-pencil drawings realistic, palpable texture. *Named One of the 54 Best Colored Pencil Drawing Books of All Time by BookAuthority* There has never been a better opportunity to master textures. Knowing how to make your surfaces and textures look real is one of the most challenging aspects of creating art in colored pencil, even for experienced artists. 101 Textures in Colored Pencil provides artists with step-by-step instructions for drawing a wide variety of the most common textures and surfaces, including sand, water, metals, foliage, wood, fabrics, stone, grass, hair, and many more. To get you started, this comprehensive guide opens with a review of tools and materials as well as basic skills, such as strokes, effects, and color mixing. Each page of instruction is a comprehensive resource on how to create a specific texture, complete with two to three easy-to-follow steps and a final, detailed image of the finished artwork. Plus, the book is organized into sections based on subject matter, so you can easily find the specific texture you're looking for. An artist's gallery in the back of the book provides examples of the textures in completed works of art. Just a sample of the textures you will learn to render: People: smooth skin; aged skin; straight, curly, and wavy hair; lips Animals & Insects: smooth, curly, and course canine fur; elephant skin; feather; fish scales Fabrics & Textiles: burlap, tweed, silk, velvet, leather, lace, sequins Glass, Stone, Ceramics, Wood & Metal: porcelain, polished silver, hammered brass, peeling paint Food & Beverage: red wine, cut citrus fruit, coconut, peach, dark chocolate Nature: smooth and rough bark, moss, river pebbles, still and rippled lake, clouds 101 Textures in Colored Pencil includes all the textures you need to create realistic masterpieces in colored pencil.

When We Were Orphans

The maze of human memory--the ways in which we accommodate and alter it, deceive and deliver ourselves with it--is territory that Kazuo Ishiguro has made his own. In his previous novels, he has explored this inner world and its manifestations in the lives of his characters with rare inventiveness and subtlety, shrewd humor and insight. In When We Were Orphans, his first novel in five years, he returns to this terrain in a brilliantly realized story that illuminates the power of one's past to determine the present. Christopher Banks, an English boy born in early-twentieth-century Shanghai, is orphaned at age nine when his mother and father both vanish under suspicious circumstances. Sent to live in England, he grows up to become a renowned detective and, more than twenty years later, returns to Shanghai, where the Sino-Japanese War is raging, to solve the mystery of the disappearances. The story is straightforward. Its telling is remarkable. Christopher's voice is controlled, detailed, and detached, its precision unsurprising in someone who has devoted his life to the examination of details and the rigors of objective thought. But within the layers of his narrative is slowly revealed what he can't, or won't, see: that his memory, despite what he wants to believe, is not unaffected by his childhood tragedies; that his powers of perception, the heralded clarity of his vision, can be blinding as well as enlightening; and that the simplest desires--a child's for his parents, a man's for understanding--may give rise to the most complicated truths. A masterful combination of narrative control and soaring imagination, When We Were Orphans is Kazuo Ishiguro at his best.