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COMM4856/6856: Women & Film

This guide is for students interested in the subject of women and film.

How to write about film

Style Guides

Need help with MLA or APA?

An exercise

Here's a formula for crafting a clear and specific argument:

[Name of film] + [verb] + [concept/theory/problem] + [clause identifying something specific in the film] + [optional clause] = your thesis statement/argument

Useful verbs: demonstrates, exposes, suggests, reveals, supports, illustrates, upholds, denies, belittles, reflects, minimizes, subverts, critiques, dismantles, reinforces, props up, is informed by, is narratively structured/shot in such a way that

Example: Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me reinforces the gendered double-standard of sexuality through the pending ritualized murder of Laura Palmer, yet the characterization of Laura is informed by a latent feminist understanding of incest and sexual abuse evidenced by her secret 'bad girl' persona.

Convenient Citing?!

Most article databases, as well as the Library Catalog, have built-in tools that format citations of the material you find in them.  You can select the style of citation you need (ASA, APA, MLA, etc.) and then copy/paste the citation into your Works Cited/References page. 

In the Library Catalog, look for Cite this next to the title of the book you want to cite:

In the database Communication & Mass Media Complete, look for Cite:

Center for Writing and Communication

Get feedback on your writing and speaking assignments at any stage in the process - up to and especially citation. The Center for Writing and Communication, housed on the first floor of McWherter Library, offers free, individual consultations in-person or online. 

Tutoring

Visit the English Learning Center in Patterson Hall for help with your papers, or contact the Educational Support Program for information on tutors.