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3D Printing @UofMLibraries

Guide to the 3D Printing Lab at the University of Memphis

Steps to Print

Follow steps for training, scheduling lab time, and sharing work in "How to Print Section"

WHAT CAN BE SCANNED?

Some objects will produce better scans than others. Here are some guidelines to help determine what will produce a good scan.

Things that are great to scan

  • Objects that are larger than a 50 x 50 mm (2 x 2 in) cylinder
  • Objects that are smaller than a 203 x 203 mm (8 x 8 in) cylinder
  • Objects weighing less than 3 kg (6.6 lbs)
  • Stationary objects
  • Opaque objects

Things that are difficult to scan

  • Transparent objects
  • Shiny or reflective objects
  • Very dark objects
  • Fuzzy objects

Things that will not scan well

  • Moving objects
  • Objects that weigh more than 3 kg (6.6 lbs)
  • Objects that are larger than a 203 x 203 mm (8 x 8 in) cylinder
  • Objects that are smaller than a 50 x 50 mm (2 x 2 in) cylinder
  • USING MAKERBOT MULTISCAN™ TECHNOLOGY

    If a completed scan still needs improvement, MakerWare for Digitizer can add additional scans of your object from different angles and combine the scan data using MakerBot MultiScan™ Technology. Click here for more on how to use MultiScan.

    OBJECT PLACEMENT

    • Object Placement: how to place a tall object3.1
    • Object Placement: how to place objects with overlaps3.2

    The guiding principle of object placement is that as much of the object as possible should be in the line of sight of both the camera and lasers during the scan.

    Place your object entirely on the MakerBot Digitizer platform in order to avoid a part of it getting "chopped off" in the scan. Then check to see if any part of your object will obscure the camera's view of any other part of your object. If so, place the object so that as much of it as possible is at the center of the turntable, and so that the hardest part to see is as visible to both the lasers and the camera. For example, the sides of a bowl could prevent the camera from seeing the inside of the bowl, or the arm of a statue could get in the way of the camera’s view of the body of the statue.

    When scanning an object without any of these kinds of overlaps, place the object so that as much of it as possible is at the center of the turntable. For example, a long, thin object might be placed upright at the center of the turntable. 3.1

    If your object does have features that overlap other parts of it, place the object so that the hardest part to see is as visible as possible to both the lasers and the camera. For example, a bowl might be placed on its side with the inside facing the center of the turntable. 3.2

    There are also exceptions to these rules. If parts of your object aren't scanning well, try positioning the object differently on the turntable.

    Tip: If your object doesn't stay in place by itself, try resting it on a piece of modeling clay.

    DIGITIZER PLACEMENT

    Finding the right location for your MakerBot Digitizer is important. Follow these guidelines to ensure the best quality scans:

    • Set up your MakerBot Digitizer in an indoor area with ample incandescent or fluorescent light. Avoid setting up near direct sunlight or windows.
    • Avoid pointing the MakerBot Digitizer's camera and lasers toward light sources. If you can see a light source in the camera feed, re-orient the scanner.
    • Place your MakerBot Digitizer on a flat, stable work surface and make sure no part of the MakerBot Digitizer extends over the surface edge. If it is not in a stable position, the MakerBot Digitizer could fall, damaging itself and causing injury to the user.
    • Make sure to set up your MakerBot Digitizer at laser at least one foot away from the nearest wall.